Recommended

Overview Of The Genetic Determinants Of Primary...

0 votes
Overview Of The Genetic Determinants Of Primary Aldosteronism
Author: Abdallah Al-salameh, Régis Cohen, Rachel Desailloud
Publisher: Derivative Works
13 pages
One time payment: €0.00
Required subscription: Free
Type of publication: Article
ISBN/ISSN: 1178-704X
DOI: 10.2147/TACG.S45620
Follow this publisher

Share this publication:

Description:

Abstract: Primary aldosteronism is the most common cause of secondary hypertension. The syndrome accounts for 10% of all cases of hypertension and is primarily caused by bilateral adrenal hyperplasia or aldosterone-producing adenoma. Over the last few years, the use of exome sequencing has significantly improved our understanding of this syndrome. Somatic mutations in theKCNJ5ATP1A1ATP2B3 or CACNA1D genes are present in more than half of all cases of aldosterone-producing adenoma (~40%, ~6%, ~1% and ~8%, respectively). Germline gain-of-function mutations in KCNJ5 are now known to cause familial hyperaldosteronism type III, and an additional form of genetic hyperaldosteronism has been reported in patients with germline mutations in CACNA1D. These genes code for channels that control ion homeostasis across the plasma membrane of zona glomerulosa cells. Moreover, all these mutations modulate the same pathway, in which elevated intracellular calcium levels lead to aldosterone hyperproduction and (in some cases) adrenal cell proliferation. From a clinical standpoint, the discovery of these mutations has potential implications for patient management. The mutated channels could be targeted by drugs, in order to control hormonal and overgrowth-related manifestations. Furthermore, some of these mutations are associated with high cell turnover and may be amenable to diagnosis via the sequencing of cell-free (circulating) DNA. However, genotype-phenotype correlations in patients harboring these mutations have yet to be characterized. Despite this recent progress, much remains to be done to elucidate the yet unknown mechanisms underlying sporadic bilateral adrenal hyperplasia.

About the publisher:

We are a publishing house devoted to reuse CC-BY licensed published materials.

 

Using CC-BY licenses:

YOU ARE FREE TO:

  • Adapt — remix, transform, and build upon the material
  • for any purpose, even commercially.
  • The licensor cannot revoke these freedoms as long as you follow the license terms.

UNDER THE FOLLOWING TERMS:

  • No additional restrictions — You may not apply legal terms or technological measures that legally restrict others
    from doing anything the license permits.

NOTICES:

  • You do not have to comply with the license for elements of the material in the public domain or where your use is permitted by an applicable exception or limitation.
  • No warranties are given. The license may not give you all of the permissions necessary for your intended use. For example, other rights such as publicity, privacy, or moral rights may limit how you use the material.

Select a payment method