Recommended

Leprosy Ulcers In A Rural Hospital Of Ethiopia:...

New Insights In Cysticercosis Transmission

0 votes
New Insights In Cysticercosis Transmission
Author: Carmen S. Arriola, Armando E. Gonzalez, Luis A. Gomez-puerta, Maria T. Lopez-urbina, Hector H. Garcia, Robert H. Gilman
Publisher: Derivative Works
4 pages
One time payment: €0.00
Required subscription: Free
Type of publication: Article
ISBN/ISSN: 1935-2727
DOI: 10.1371/0003247
Follow this publisher

Share this publication:

Description:

Taenia solium infection causes severe neurological disease in humans. Even though infection and exposure to swine cysticercosis is scattered throughout endemic villages, location of the tapeworm only explains some of the nearby infections and is not related to location of seropositive pigs. Other players might be involved in cysticercosis transmission. In this study we hypothesize that pigs that carry nematodes specific to dung beetles are associated with cysticercosis infection and/or exposure. We carried out a cross-sectional study of six villages in an endemic region in northern Peru. We euthanized all pigs (326) in the villages and performed necropsies to diagnose cysticercosis. For each pig, we counted cysticerci; measured anti-cysticercus antibodies; identified intestinal nematodes; tabulated distance to nearest human tapeworm infection; and recorded age, sex, productive stage, and geographic reference. For the purpose of this paper, we defined cysticercosis infection as the presence of at least one cysticercus in pig muscles, and cysticercosis exposure as seropositivity to anti-cysticercus antibodies with the presence of 0–5 cysticerci. Compared to pigs without nematode infections, those pigs infected with the nematode Ascarops strongylina were significantly associated with the presence of cysticerci (OR: 4.30, 95%CI: 1.83–10.09). Similarly, pigs infected with the nematode Physocephalus sexalatus were more likely to have cysticercosis exposure (OR: 2.21, 95%CI: 1.50–3.28). In conclusion, our results suggest that there appears to be a strong positive association between the presence of nematodes and both cysticercosis infection and exposure in pigs. The role of dung beetles in cysticercosis dynamics should be further investigated.

About the publisher:

We are a publishing house devoted to reuse CC-BY licensed published materials.

 

Using CC-BY licenses:

YOU ARE FREE TO:

  • Adapt — remix, transform, and build upon the material
  • for any purpose, even commercially.
  • The licensor cannot revoke these freedoms as long as you follow the license terms.

UNDER THE FOLLOWING TERMS:

  • No additional restrictions — You may not apply legal terms or technological measures that legally restrict others
    from doing anything the license permits.

NOTICES:

  • You do not have to comply with the license for elements of the material in the public domain or where your use is permitted by an applicable exception or limitation.
  • No warranties are given. The license may not give you all of the permissions necessary for your intended use. For example, other rights such as publicity, privacy, or moral rights may limit how you use the material.

Select a payment method