Recommended

A New Presumed Igkappa Gene Implied In The Sea ...

Immunologic Special Forces: Anti-pathogen Cyto...

Production And Characterization Of Monoclonal A...

Dichotomy In Fcγriib Deficiency And Autoimmune...

Pectoralis Major Flaps During Axillary Dissection

0 votes
Hyaluronidase Facilitated Subcutaneous Immunoglobulin In Primary Immunodeficiency
Author: Stephen Jolles
Publisher: Derivative Works
9 pages
One time payment: €0.00
Required subscription: Free
Type of publication: Article
ISBN/ISSN: 2253-1556
DOI: 10.2147/31136
Follow this publisher

Share this publication:

Description:

Abstract: Immunoglobulin (Ig)-replacement therapy represents the mainstay of treatment for patients with primary antibody deficiency and is administered either intravenously (IVIg) or subcutaneously (SCIg). While hyaluronidase has been used in clinical practice for over 50 years, the development of a high-purity recombinant form of this enzyme (recombinant human hyaluronidase PH20) has recently enabled the study of repeated and more prolonged use of hyaluronidase in facilitating the delivery of SC medicines. It has been used in a wide range of clinical settings to give antibiotics, local anesthetics, insulin, morphine, fluid replacement, and larger molecules, such as antibodies. Hyaluronidase has been used to help overcome the limitations on the maximum volume that can be delivered into the SC space by enabling dispersion of SCIg and its absorption into lymphatics. The rate of facilitated SCIg (fSCIg) infusion is equivalent to that of IVIg, and the volume administered at a single site can be greater than 700 mL, a huge increase over conventional SCIg, at 20–40 mL. The use of fSCIg avoids the higher incidence of systemic side effects of IVIg, and it has higher bioavailability than SCIg. Data on the long-term safety of this approach are currently lacking, as fSCIg has only recently become available. fSCIg may help several areas of patient management in primary antibody deficiency, and the extent to which it may be used in future will depend on long-term safety data and cost–benefit analysis.

About the publisher:

We are a publishing house devoted to reuse CC-BY licensed published materials.

 

Using CC-BY licenses:

YOU ARE FREE TO:

  • Adapt — remix, transform, and build upon the material
  • for any purpose, even commercially.
  • The licensor cannot revoke these freedoms as long as you follow the license terms.

UNDER THE FOLLOWING TERMS:

  • No additional restrictions — You may not apply legal terms or technological measures that legally restrict others
    from doing anything the license permits.

NOTICES:

  • You do not have to comply with the license for elements of the material in the public domain or where your use is permitted by an applicable exception or limitation.
  • No warranties are given. The license may not give you all of the permissions necessary for your intended use. For example, other rights such as publicity, privacy, or moral rights may limit how you use the material.

Select a payment method